Science Saving Sharks

Written by Dr. Michelle Heupel

How are scientists helping to save sharks?

There is a lot of information on the internet about sharks and how to save them. Some of it is good, some of it is bad, some of it has a purpose, some of it has none. I’m starting to sound like Dr.Suess with all of this, but this is how things are in our world of increasing internet and social media. So there seems to be a lot happening and a lot of people involved in the cause. This is great because getting people to understand the problem is one way to create solutions, as long as what we tell them is correct.

So what is my role in all of the workings of shark (and ray!) conservation? My job is to create information. This is one of the best parts of my job – getting to learn things that maybe no one else in the world knows. What then? Then I need to get the information written up and published so others can use it and learn from it. This isn’t just about telling other scientists what I learned, this is also about making sure people who make decisions about management get the new information if they need it.

There are so many questions about sharks and rays. So many things we don’t know. For some species we don’t know how long they live, how many pups they have, how far they swim, and even how many are there. We need all of this information. People who decide if it is ok to fish sharks and rays, or whether we need to make a marine protected area, need this information. If they don’t know these answers they can’t make good decisions because sometimes they’ll have to guess what to do. My job is to give them the answers so they don’t have to guess (as often, we still have to guess sometimes). This same information is also used by conservation groups. If a manager makes a decision that doesn’t match the scientific information then the conservationists can use the information I provide to try to change the decision.

So, it seems like I sit outside of all the action doesn’t it? I don’t make the decisions and I usually don’t challenge the people who make the decisions. Those are other people’s jobs. My job is to get the information or ammunition needed to argue or make decisions. So, does someone like me ever really make a difference? You bet. Work I did to define what a shark nursery is has been used to save habitat for Endangered smalltooth sawfish. My science is listed in the Federal Register in the protections for sawfish, a real world result of my science! My data from studying mortality rates of blacktip sharks has been used to adjust the number of blacktip sharks caught in US fisheries. This was an unexpected outcome of one of my projects, but one that proved very useful to managers. These two examples are not the things my research is most known for, but they are some of the bits I am most proud of – times when science made a difference.

Times are complicated and our oceans are damaged, but with hard work and good science I hope to continue to make a difference where I can. We need more answers to save sharks and rays, and that means we need more science.

Dr. Michelle Heupel releasing a young blacktip shark in Florida

Dr. Michelle Heupel releasing a young blacktip shark in Florida

An endangered smalltooth sawfish from southern Florida

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